Tag Archives: wardrobe

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Unremitting Entrance by Janelle Adsit

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industry can make pinks now that are 99-100% permanent
pink keychain with my sister’s face etched into it
pink quartzite bench on a grassy Fort Collins hill,
pink tulips the neighbors planted, pink
candles, pink tattoo of a pink last-gift candle, pink
vases, materials as metaphors—the necessary attempt
at conflation, pink bracelets with her
name—color is more symbolic than sensory
every skin fleck and fingernail
gone to an impalpable gray
in May with its hibiscus pink and its leaving
crabapples, soapwart, begonia

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This selection comes from Janelle Adsit’s collection Unremitting Entrance available now from Spuyten Duyvil. Purchase your copy here!

Janelle Adsit‘s poetry has appeared in publications such as Sixth Finch, Confrontation, The Cultural Society, and Lalitamba. She lives in northern California where she teaches creative writing at Humboldt State University. www.janelleadsit.net

Ben McClendon is a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Tennessee. He previously studied poetry at Northern Arizona University after teaching high school English for several years. His poems have appeared in Indiana Review, Yemassee, Ceasura, Chariton Review, Redivider, Rattle, and elsewhere. He is currently Assistant Poetry Editor for Grist: The Journal for Writers and a poetry editor for Four Ties Lit Review. Ben lives with his husband in Knoxville.

 

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Alicia Rebecca Myers’ My Seaborgium

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Chorus

The Argos cement truck
circles back a third time.
I’ve forgotten if the hundred eyes
were housed in one head
or many. These days I care so little
for myth, how witness works.
Now when I catch sight
of myself in windows of Last Resort
I deliberately extend my abdomen,
shine like a buffet
Buddha begging touch. I round out
like a hassock. I believe in God just so
I can revise:
hello Spry Fundus, hello
Winged Stria.
My memory of pain no more
than the memory of having once compared
a good apple to a good orange.
My own eyes, dazzling and compound.
Mornings, I outswim
women half my age. With a featherweight
heart I fold and refold
the layette, dream of kicks
from a fruitless chorus. I need them
behind me. To them I’ve upturned
my alms bowl. Hello Golden Reticulate,
hello Show. I’ve renamed
every leaf, every bereavement.

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This selection comes from Alicia Rebecca Myers’ chapbook My Seaborgium available now from Brain Mill Press. Purchase your copy here!

Alicia Rebecca Myers is a poet and essayist whose work has appeared recently or is forthcoming in The Rumpus, The American Literary Review, Gulf Coast, jubilat, The Carolina Quarterly, The Fairy Tale Review, and Day One. In February of 2014, she was awarded a residency at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center in Nebraska City. A graduate of NYU’s MFA Program, she currently teaches at Wells College. You can find her online at aliciarebeccamyers.com.

Ben McClendon is a PhD student in creative writing at the University of Tennessee. He previously studied poetry at Northern Arizona University after teaching high school English for several years. His poems have appeared in Indiana Review, Yemassee, Cæsura, Chariton Review, Redivider, Rattle, and elsewhere. He is currently Assistant Poetry Editor for Grist: The Journal for Writers and a poetry editor for Four Ties Lit Review. Ben lives with his husband in Knoxville.

 

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Allie Marini’s Before Fire: Divorce Poems

allie and george


Streuselküchen, Prasselküchen, Butterküchen

Some say, lying is done with words & silence,
but it is also done with küchen, streusel
something scattered or sprinkled:
flour, cinnamon, butter, sugar, crème, nut meats, cherries, fat—
all the makings of happy marriages or happier funerals.

Simple cakes, these—though the baker knows better.
Yeast & milk, the freud-und-leid, mixed together to form dough,
which though silky to the touch, takes heft & might to make smooth.
In the kitchen, the baker kneads by hand, flipping & punching
until every knot turns soft & velvet.
Leave it still, heart-warmed, until it doubles.

Zuckerküchen assumes nothing.
Flat cakes for oblong unions, lopsided loves & slivered luck.
Most of the time, it’s more crumb than cake;
though sometimes—a puff pastry or short crust foundation,
a dough formed from shortening, more pie than küchen
it’s up to the baker to decide: Sweet is sweet.

Years ago, a Silesian baker tied her apron strings,
pulling rolled pastries & butter-sugar tartlets,
veined & studded with pockets of cinnamon,
out of the warmth of her oven—to get to a husband’s heart,
travel a path from his tongue, & when he wrongs you,
invent Käseküchen; soft cheese will mask the salt.
Emboss it with cherries. Show him how sweet it is to sit at your table.

When he strays & comes back to you, celebrate the ripe fruit of reconciliation,
a bit sharp, sour-sweet as the reddest of strawberries in your famous Erdbeerküchen.
Lace it with an edge of whipped cream—
forget the way the crust crumbles under the tines of your dessert fork.

Later, use a flat pan for a simple confection:
Baumküchen, whose layers are the rings of a tree,
gone from acorn to oak in the oven—
mature & ripe, its filling pinwheels vanilla, nutmeg-glazed apple slices,
the pinch of occasional jealousies & the remaining scars of old fights,
strident as an unexpected spike of ginger or cinnamon—
softened by a flutter of cardamom &
a skillful piping of sweet white icing on the top.

What’s left, in the kitchen,
after the husbands have been wedded, forgiven & buried,
after the kids have moved out &
the guests have come & gone:
just crumbs, & the memory of desserts not always sweet.
Beerdigungsküchen; the baker grieves.

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This selection comes from Allie Marini Batts’ collection Before Fire: Divorce Poems, available now from ELJ Publications!  Purchase your copy here!

Allie Marini holds degrees from Antioch University of Los Angeles & New College of Florida, meaning she can explain deconstructionism, but cannot perform simple math. Her work has been a finalist for Best of the Net & nominated for the Pushcart Prize. She is managing editor for the NonBinary Review, Unbound Octavo, & Zoetic Press, and co-edits for Lucky Bastard Press with her man, performance poet B Deep. She has previously served on the masthead for Lunch Ticket, Spry Literary Journal, The Weekenders Magazine, Mojave River Review & Press, & The Bookshelf Bombshells. Allie is the author of  Unmade & Other Poems (Beautysleep Press), You Might Curse Before You Bless (ELJ Publications) wingless, scorched & beautiful (Imaginary Friend Press), Before Fire (ELJ Publications), This Is How We End (Bitterzoet), Pictures From The Center Of The Universe (Paper Nautilus, winner of the Vella Prize), Cliffdiving (Nomadic Press), And When She Tasted of Knowledge (Nomadic Press), Southern Cryptozoology: A Field Guide To Beasts Of The Southern Wild (Hyacinth Girl Press), Here Comes Hell {dancing girl press}, & Heart Radicals, a collaborative collection with Les Kay, Janeen Pergrin Rastall & Sandra Marchetti (ELJ Publications).  Allie rarely sleeps, and her mother has hypothesized that she is actually a robot fueled by Diet Coke & Sri Racha. She met George R.R. Martin & did not die. Proof of immortality? Not sure, but it does make a compelling argument…Find her on the web: https://www.facebook.com/AllieMariniBatts or @kiddeternity.

Erin Elizabeth Smith is the Creative Director at the Sundress Academy for the Arts and the author of two full-length collections, The Naming of Strays (Gold Wake, 2011) and The Fear of Being Found, which will be re-released from Zoetic Press later this year. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals, including Mid-American, 32 Poems, Zone 3, Gargoyle, Tusculum Review, and Crab Orchard Review. She holds a PhD in Creative Writing and teaches a bit of everything in the English Department at the University of Tennessee. She serves as the managing editor of Sundress Publications and The Wardrobe.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: G.L. Morrison’s “Chiaroscuro Kisses”

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Relentless Blue

I look for you in this poem with both hands
every word like the fingers of a blind sculptor
searching for your familiar face in the sightless clay.

If I were a painter, what I want to say
to you would be a shade of blue that couldn’t be bought
only blended by loving curiosity and relentless patience
blue as sun rising on the ocean after a storm

blue as dawn, obsidian about to shatter
in a wet cacophony of color.
Azure love. Sapphire uncertainty.
Hungers marbled turquoise and lapis lazuli.

If I were a sailor, this poem would be
a hundred days at sea.
Lips cracked with salt and silence.

Above me, in the wet, endless sky clouds row by
with a cargohold of storms and birds for barnacles.
Gulls shriek like lonely women.
Every star is an omen, I navigate by touch.

Below me, in the wet and endless sea
is everything I dare imagine, everything
that will ever and will never be
wide and spiny as puffer fish.

Infinitely blue and filled with stones, fish, and sunken
treasure; skeletons of clouds, birds, and stars;
sharks, mermaids, and the myriad of scuttling mysteries.
This poem is adrift in tomorrow’s current
somewhere off the coast of yesterday.

Your hand on this page is bone china,
the pottery buried with Pharaohs, Klimt’s
yellow kiss, swollen-mouthed as O’Keefe flowers.
Your hand on this page is the woman who waits
in a cottage overlooking the sea
where every hundred-day journey hopes to end.


This selection comes from G.L. Morrison’s collection Chiaroscuro Kisses, available from Headmistress Press. Purchase your copy here!

Born in Utah in 1966, G.L. Morrison was wet-nursed by Poetry whose savage, urgent milk has sustained her all these years. An oracle of knives and wings; an acolyte of reckless gods; channeled by a disabled poet in the Northwest: she is an intersectional feminist who moonlights as a sporadic blogger/writing teacher/freelancer, Oregon Chair of the Communist Party USA, and overzealous grandmother. Over the last 30 years, she has feathered her nest with the contributor copies of hundreds of magazines, a dozen anthologies, and a fistful of writing awards. She has been noted in Ms. and twice interviewed in Mother Jones. Her nonfiction writing stands at the crossroads of racial/economic justice, LGBT issues, and body-politics/fat-activism. Regie Cabico pronounced Chiaroscuro Kisses (Headmistress Press, 2013) “one of the most inspiring collections of poetry I’ve seen in the last decade.”

Mari Hailu is a recent graduate of Southern Methodist University where she simultaneously received a Bachelor of Arts in Music and a Bachelor of Arts in English with a concentration in Creative Writing. As a Managing Editor of The Wardrobe, a blog series affiliated with Sundress Publications, she finds fellow poets to read and learn from. She hopes to have the opportunity to share her writing with the world very soon.

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MARCH/APRIL 2014 WARDROBE SUBMISSIONS

Here is the list of the amazing writers we received work from for The Wardrobe in March & April of this year.

Lindsay Lusby’s Imago from Dancing Girl Press (2014)

Tasha Cotter’s Some Churches from Gold Wake Press (June 2013)

Allie Marini Batt’s You Might Curse Before You Bless from ELJ Publications (April 2013)

Jennifer Militello’s Body Thesaurus from Tupelo Press (2013)

Judith Gille’s The View from Casa Chepitos from Davis Bay Press (October 2013)

M’s That Mythic Country Called Closure from Concrete Wolf (2013)

Elizabeth Kerlikowske’s Suicide Notes was self-published (2014)

Elizabeth Kerlikowske’s Last Hula from Rock in the River Lit Series (SRCA)

Sally Rosen Kindred’s Book of Asters from Mayapple Press (2014)

Kirsten Imani Kasai’s Rhapsody in Snakeskin: Tales of Erotic Horror from E-Book distributed by Amazon (March 2012)

Kristen Clodfelter’s CASUALTIES from RopeWalk Press (October 2013)

Jennifer Cheng’s Invocation: An Essay from New Michigan Press (January 2001)

Sarah Marcus’ BACKCOUNTRY from Finishing Line Press (2013)

Sarah Marcus’ Every Bird, To You from Crisis Chronicles Press (2013)

Elizabeth J Cohen’s The Green Condition

J Gay’s Decomposition from Dancing Girl Press (2014)

Jessica Ankeny’s One Simple Step to Keeping a Clean Gun from Dancing Girl Press (2013)

Lori Lamothe’s Diary in Irregular Ink from ELJ Publications (March 2014)

Amy MacLennan’s Weathering from Uttered Chaos Press (2012)

Angela Howe Decker’s Splendid Catastrophe from Finishing Line Press (2014)

G.L. Morrison’s Chiaroscuro from Headmistress Press (2013)

Mary Meriam’s Word Hot from Headmistress Press (2013)

Susana H. Case’s 4 Rms w Vu from Mayapple Press (2014)

Judith Terzi’s Ghazal for a Chambermaid from Finishing Line Press (2013)

 

Keep the excellence coming by submitting here!

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February 2014 Wardrobe Submissions

In the two months of The Wardrobe, we received 100 submissions of books and chapbooks by women writers.  While we will be unable to showcase them all, we continue to feature one new writer every week with different curators each month.

Here is the list of the amazing writers we received work from in February.

 

Maureen Alsop’s Mantic from Augury Books (2013)

Allie Marini Batts’s You Might Curse Before You Bless from ELJ Publications (April 2013)

Karissa Chen’s OF BIRDS AND LOVERS from Corgi Snorkel Press (2013)

Tasha Cotter’s Some Churches from Gold Wake Press (June 2013)

Kristina Marie Darling’s Music for another life from BlazeVOX Books (November 2013)

Jean Donnelly’s city

Lauren Eggert-Crowe’s The Exhibit from Hyacinth Girl Press (March 2013)

Michelle Bonczek Evory’s Art of the Nipple from Orange Monkey Publishing (October 2013)

Judith Gille’s The View from Casa Chepitos from Davis Bay Press (October 2013)

Lois Marie Harrod’s How Marlene Mae Longs for Truth from Dancing Girl Press (2013)

Kirsten Imani Kasai’s Rhapsody in Snakeskin: Tales of Erotic Horror from E-Book distributed by Amazon (March 2012)

Elizabeth Kerlikowske’s Suicide Notes was self-published (2014)

Elizabeth Kerlikowske’s Last Hula from Rock in the River Lit Series (SRCA)

Sally Rosen Kindred’s Darling Hands, Darling Tongue from Hyacinth Girl Press (2003)

Sally Rosen Kindred’s Book of Asters from Mayapple Press (2014)

Kathleen Kirk’s Interior Sculpture: poems in the voice of Camille Claudel from Dancing Girl Press (2013)

Lindsay Lusby’s Imago from Dancing Girl Press (2014)

M’s To That Mythic Country Called Closure from Concrete Wolf (September 2013)

Shikha Malaviya’s Geography of Tongues from The (Great) Indian Poetry Collective (2014)

Sarah Mangold’s The Goddess Can Be Recognized By Her Step from Dusie Kollektiv (February 2014)

Dana Guthrie Martin’s (in the space where i was) from Hyacinth Girl Press (2012)

Jennifer Militello’s Body Thesaurus from Tupelo Press (2013)

Cindy Savett’s Child in the Road from Parlor Press (2007)

Julia Klatt Singer’s A Tangled Path To Heaven from North Star Press (June 2013)

Angela Torres’s Blood Orange from Aquarius Press (September 2013)

Meg Tuite’s Her Skin is a Costume from Red Bird Chapbooks (November 2013)

Unknown Extremadura from Finishing Line Press (May 2013)

Julie Marie Wade’s WHEN I WAS STRAIGHT from A Midsummer Night’s Press (2014)

Amy Watkins’s Milk and Water from Yellow Flag Press (2014)

 

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed – Becca Barniskis’ “Mimi and Xavier Star in a Museum That Fits Entirely in One’s Pocket”

from “Act I”

My Name Is Xavier Box

I am unusually clever for my size
and shape. I turn on a pistol,
sleep cold leaded most nights.
I enter head first the dim hall,
look for letters left lying
about—unsent or incognito.
I have been sent to investigate
an almost secret war.
Its casualties are ashamed
and hide their injuries.
Their communiqués are in code.
I listen outside. And devise
my plans accordingly.
My Name Is Mimi Sprig

I have whole boxes of soldier
that I light on fire
to read by.
Those small heads burn
for some time.
‘I eat my enemies! I drink my foes!’
I would tell anyone who listened
(usually at breakfast).
But no one is left to hear.

Today I will sweep out all the rooms
and polish the empty tins
and clever plaster foodstuffs
arrayed so carefully in the pantry.
Then I will roll bandages.

 

This selection is from Becca Barniskis’ chapbook Mimi and Xavier Star in a Museum That Fits Entirely in One’s Pocket, available from Anomalous PressPurchase your copy here!

Becca Barniskis’ chapbook of poems, Mimi and Xavier Star in a Museum That Fits Entirely in One’s Pocket is just out (2014) from Anomalous Press and is available also as a musical collaboration with Nick Jaffe in both vinyl and digital formats. Her poetry has appeared in or is forthcoming from numerous journals, among them Handsome, The Boiler, Mid-American Review, burntdistrictConduit, Prairie Schooner, Blackbird and the Northwest Review. She teaches poetry and she works as a freelance writer and consultant in arts education for a range of schools, arts organizations and public agencies across the upper Midwest and around the US. Along with her co-authors Nick Jaffe and Barbara Hackett Cox she wrote the Teaching Artist Handbook, vol. 1: Tools, Techniques and Ideas to Help Any Artist Teach (University of Chicago Press). Becca is an associate editor at the Teaching Artist Journal. She also helped launch and develop Artist to Artist, a growing network of artists and educators who meet regularly to develop and share their teaching practice.

T.A. Noonan is the author of several books and chapbooks, most recently four sparks fall: a novella (Chicago Center for Literature and Photography, 2013) and, with Erin Elizabeth Smith, Skate or Die (Dusie Kollektiv, 2014). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Reunion: The Dallas ReviewWest Wind ReviewHobartNinth Letter, and Phoebe, among others. A weightlifter, crafter, priestess, and all-around woman of action, she serves as the Associate Editor of Sundress Publications, Founding Editor of Flaming Giblet Press, and Literary Arts Director for the Sundress Academy of the Arts.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Julie Marie Wade’s “When an Old Classmate Learns I Am a Lesbian”

jmw
WHEN AN OLD CLASSMATE LEARNS I AM A LESBIAN

“Oh my god! I knew it! I always knew it. I was
like Julie is so gay, & people were like oh,
whatever, you just think everybody’s gay because
it’s an all-girls school, but I knew I wasn’t gay, &
I knew most of those girls weren’t gay, so I was
like fuck you, Jasmine, go suck on one of your
Jolly Rancher rings! Do you remember those?
So, how’s it going? Do you have a girlfriend or
something? I have to tell you in college I had a
gay roommate, & she got lucky like every single
night. seriously. I’d come back to the room &
there’d be some ribbon tied around the door,
so I’d have to like hang out by the vending
machines in the lobby looking like a total loser.
I never saw the girls go, though. I guess they
must have gone out the fire escape or
something. Nobody thinks there would be that
many gay girls in Iowa, you know, but I guess
they’re kind of everywhere now. Do you still
live on the West Coast or what? If I were gay,
I would be like San Francisco, here I come, but
truth be told, it’s kind of dirty. My boyfriend took
me there once—we’re actually engaged so
technically he’s my fiancé now, but you know,
he wasn’t then, so—we just walked around a lot &
got some of that good chocolate & saw the seals,
& I was like hey, isn’t there some really cool old prison
that you can see if you take a ferry from here, & then
he was like San Francisco is full of fairies, ha, ha!
I hope that doesn’t offend you. I mean, I thought
it was funny, but my boyfriend is like totally down
with gay people. He would really like you because
you’re smart & it’s kind of hot when a girl isn’t
into you at all, you know? Well, I guess you would
want a girl to be into you, huh? so scratch that.
But I mean most girls are always trying to get with
him & then I have to be like whoa, hands off, that’s
my man. Sometimes I think it would be so much
easier to be gay. It would just take all the pressure
off. I wouldn’t have to get my hair done or worry
how my boobs looked, & if somebody called me
fat, I could just be like I’m a lesbian, douchebag.
I mean, seriously, do you even have to wax?

This selection is from Julie Marie Wade’s chapbook When I Was Straight, available from A Midsummer Night’s PressPurchase your copy here!

Julie Marie Wade is the author of Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures (Colgate University Press, 2010; Bywater Books 2014), winner of the Lambda Literary Award in Lesbian Memoir; Without: Poems (Finishing Line Press, 2010); Small Fires: Essays (Sarabande Books, 2011); Postage Due: Poems & Prose Poems (White Pine Press, 2013), winner of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series; and Tremolo: An Essay (Bloom Books, 2013), winner of the Bloom Nonfiction Chapbook Prize. She is a member of the creative writing faculty at Florida International University.

Mary Stone Dockery is the author of One Last Cigarette, a poetry collection, and the chapbooks Blink Finch and The Dopamine Letters. Her poetry and prose has appeared in Stirring: A Literary Collection, Gutter Eloquence, Arts & Letters, Redactions, and others. She earned her MFA from the University of Kansas in 2012. Currently, she lives and writes in St. Joseph, MO, where she teaches English at Missouri Western State University and coordinates the First Thursdays Open Mic at Norty’s Bar and Grill.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Julie Marie Wade’s “When My Mother Learns I Am a Lesbian”

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WHEN MY MOTHER LEARNS I AM A LESBIAN

At first, silence, & then a thud of breath as if
her throat has slid through the chute of her lungs
& landed, heavy—like a stone—like a sword
lodged suddenly inside it.

“This explains why you don’t wear make-up!” she wails.

A snap—a pulsing panic pulled back & lightly
camouflaged as fear: “What will I tell my friends?
How can I tell my friends? I can never tell my friends!”
Finally, fatigued & determined: “No one must know.”

I give her permission to lie—privilege she takes
as right. I promise her nothing has changed except
the second chromosome of the body resting next to me.

she asks, not wanting the answer: “i suppose you have
to sleep in the same bed?”

«No, in sleeping bags, Mom, cocooned on separate couches
still wrapped in our swaddling clothes.»

I could have said it, but I didn’t.
No tolerance for the absurd.
My mother’s voice, all tissue paper & cellophane,
turns tearful, liquid in its pain: “Where did we go wrong?”

I want to tell her not to forgive me, plead through
the twisted wires that she will not waste her prayers.

“We raised you with God’s laws,” she says.
“We told you to be pure.”

“You raised me to love,” I say.
“You told me to be happy.”

«But she didn’t mean this way, didn’t mean this way,
Dear God, she didn’t mean this way.»

I watch out the window, sigh.
Already prayers are streaming up the sky.

This selection is from Julie Marie Wade’s chapbook When I Was Straight, available from A Midsummer Night’s PressPurchase your copy here!

Julie Marie Wade is the author of Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures (Colgate University Press, 2010; Bywater Books 2014), winner of the Lambda Literary Award in Lesbian Memoir; Without: Poems(Finishing Line Press, 2010); Small Fires: Essays (Sarabande Books, 2011); Postage Due: Poems & Prose Poems (White Pine Press, 2013), winner of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series; and Tremolo: An Essay (Bloom Books, 2013), winner of the Bloom Nonfiction Chapbook Prize. She is a member of the creative writing faculty at Florida International University.

Mary Stone Dockery is the author of One Last Cigarette, a poetry collection, and the chapbooksBlink Finch and The Dopamine Letters. Her poetry and prose has appeared in Stirring: A Literary CollectionGutter EloquenceArts & LettersRedactions, and others. She earned her MFA from the University of Kansas in 2012. Currently, she lives and writes in St. Joseph, MO, where she teaches English at Missouri Western State University and coordinates the First Thursdays Open Mic at Norty’s Bar and Grill.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Julie Marie Wade’s “When I Was Straight”

jmw

WHEN I WAS STRAIGHT

A ruler was called a straight-edge

Straight talk was smart talk

straight man was funny by proxy

Sober people walked straight lines

straight face was useful for poker

Straight-laced was superior to rash

Straight As were the standard for achievement

The righteous path was called The Straight & Narrow

Good girls were always straight as an arrow

With a straight bat was the way to play sport

straight-shooter never minced words

Peter told Wendy straight on till morning

Do you follow me? Did you get it all straight?

 

This selection is from Julie Marie Wade’s chapbook When I Was Straight, available from A Midsummer Night’s PressPurchase your copy here!

Julie Marie Wade is the author of Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures (Colgate University Press, 2010; Bywater Books 2014), winner of the Lambda Literary Award in Lesbian Memoir; Without: Poems(Finishing Line Press, 2010); Small Fires: Essays (Sarabande Books, 2011); Postage Due: Poems & Prose Poems (White Pine Press, 2013), winner of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series; and Tremolo: An Essay (Bloom Books, 2013), winner of the Bloom Nonfiction Chapbook Prize. She is a member of the creative writing faculty at Florida International University.

Mary Stone Dockery is the author of One Last Cigarette, a poetry collection, and the chapbooksBlink Finch and The Dopamine Letters. Her poetry and prose has appeared in Stirring: A Literary CollectionGutter EloquenceArts & LettersRedactions, and others. She earned her MFA from the University of Kansas in 2012. Currently, she lives and writes in St. Joseph, MO, where she teaches English at Missouri Western State University and coordinates the First Thursdays Open Mic at Norty’s Bar and Grill.

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