The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: “Break the Habit” by Tara Betts

Betts_womaninred

Sleeping

I only dodge a few nightmares.
Most nights, I imitate a stone
with steady breath for six hours.
There are days when my body
dictates a double shift of shut eyes.
I wake, a weekend has passed.
When tears slick my cheeks
I collide with awake too quickly,
soaked pillow and clumped lashes.
At first, I only saw pointed fingers,
his open mouth almost braying.
Gasps shake me into waking.
The last dream was his silence
cradling my rock to questions
thundering in my ears, a pair
of baskets I cannot cover.


This selection comes from the collection Break the Habit, available from Trio House Press. Order your copy here. Our curator for September is Donna Vorreyer.

Tara Betts is the author of Break the Habit (Trio House Press, 2016) and Arc & Hue (Willow Books, 2009).  Tara is also one of the co-editors of The Beiging of America: Personal Narratives About Being Mixed Race in the 21st Century (2Leaf Press, 2017). Her work has appeared in POETRYAmerican Poetry ReviewEssenceNYLON, and numerous anthologies. She teaches at University of Illinois-Chicago.

Donna Vorreyer is the author of Every Love Story is an Apocalypse Story (Sundress Publications, 2016) and A House of Many Windows (Sundress Publications, 2013) as well as seven chapbooks, most recently Encantado, a collaboration with artist Matt Kish from Redbird Chapbooks. She is the reviews editor for Stirring: A Literary Collection, and she works as a middle school teacher in the Chicago suburbs.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: “Break the Habit” by Tara Betts

Betts_womaninred

Lovesong

After he left, you bought new headphones
with slim, silver device that slips into pockets
without square buttons, cassettes, or CDs. You
build a library of growing sounds old and new.
Add the British girl who taps into ore of women’s
losses like a prospector. Adele rises brash, full-bodied,
telling off the one who walked out foolhardy
and soon to regret. You need that rhapsody since
you are spending Christmas and coquitos with
your girl back from Brazil. She is sun-kissed
with Tinker Bell flip flops. You are meeting her when
she lands. On the way to Newark Airport baggage claim,
you find yourself alone in a shuttle car winding around
the airport through the quiet night. Her voice sonorous
almost reminds you of La Lupe, pure soar of puro teatro,
but it is the song itself that lured you to loving The Cure,
and Robert Smith’s red lipstick pout and hair sprayed into
upright crown and curls. In eighth grade, you kept thinking
of his build into the phrase whenever I’m alone with you
You are alone, separated and on this shuttle car. Adele sings
this song that permeates more than twenty of your years.
It is new again, like the moment when you begin singing
to your reflection in the car’s window, like a girl
with a hairbrush and the perfect mirror to pose. Hands
thrown up, pointing, tapping to your chest, eyes closed.
This is your concert, a serenade to break tears.
You tell yourself You make me feel like I am clean again.
You make me feel like I am young again. However far
away, however long I stay, Whatever words I say…
You point at your chest and say I will always love you.
The shuttle stops, doors open, no one enters, doors close.
You press repeat, start singing some short triumph again.


This selection comes from the collection Break the Habit, available from Trio House Press. Order your copy here. Our curator for September is Donna Vorreyer.

Tara Betts is the author of Break the Habit (Trio House Press, 2016) and Arc & Hue (Willow Books, 2009).  Tara is also one of the co-editors of The Beiging of America: Personal Narratives About Being Mixed Race in the 21st Century (2Leaf Press, 2017). Her work has appeared in POETRYAmerican Poetry ReviewEssenceNYLON, and numerous anthologies. She teaches at University of Illinois-Chicago.

Donna Vorreyer is the author of Every Love Story is an Apocalypse Story (Sundress Publications, 2016) and A House of Many Windows (Sundress Publications, 2013) as well as seven chapbooks, most recently Encantado, a collaboration with artist Matt Kish from Redbird Chapbooks. She is the reviews editor for Stirring: A Literary Collection, and she works as a middle school teacher in the Chicago suburbs.

An Interview with Jan LaPerle

Jan LaPerle, a career counselor for the Army Reserves, has published three books of poetry and fiction. On October 7-8, she’ll lead the Sundress Academy for the Arts‘ first writing retreat for veterans and current service members, along with poet Jeb A. Herrin.

Sean Purio, an active duty officer and student in the University of Tennessee’s creative writing Ph.D. program, interviewed LaPerle on behalf of Sundress.

Sean Purio: What advice would you give to people making the transition back into the civilian world? If you were to suggest to them a particular book, poetry collection, author, or film, what would it be?

Jan LaPerle: I’ve never been deployed, never been to war, so I’m not sure my advice here counts for much. But there are other transitions. A few weeks ago my husband and I watched American Sniper. There is a moment in the movie when Chris Kyle had just returned from his third, maybe fourth deployment and he was sitting in front of the TV – the TV was off – and his family was running around him, laughing, screaming through the house and he did not seem to hear them, he did not move, just kept staring blankly. Every time I return from Annual Training or a school or some other mission I’ve been on for the Army, I feel, for several days, like Chris in that chair. It’s like stepping from one world to the next; suddenly I’m just home and it’s just really different. In a few days I’m okay again though. For Chris it took a long time – it took finding new purpose, so that’s what my advice would be: find purpose.

SP: Is there a particular book, poetry collection, author, or film you would suggest people encounter before going into the armed forces? Why?

JL: I’m not really the kind of person who does a lot of preparation for making major life decisions. I joined in 1996 when my parents divorced and my dad cut me off from college funds. I went on Active Duty without having any idea what it would be like – I just needed somewhere to go, something to do. I finished my time, got out completely and 10 years later joined all over again into the Reserves. I joined because it seemed to be the right thing to do at that moment. Turns out it was.

My husband and I listened to Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance on our way to NH last summer. Vance discusses how his time in the Marines sort of straightened him out, forced him to have discipline, and provided him with mentors who cared about his welfare. Last weekend when I was cleaning out our attic, I found a picture of me at my Basic Training graduation. My eyes were red and puffy. I don’t know the name of the Soldier beside me, but I remember the feeling of not wanting to leave because for the first time I really felt like I was part of something. During a 12-mile road march I remember falling behind and looking ahead to PVT Jones who was looking back at me with her hand out, waiting to pull me along.

SP: What do you think is the role of cultivating an artistic sensibility—a way of perceiving the world—for those who serve (or have served) in the armed forces?

JL: Two I can explain right away. The first has to be as a release. I’m a Career Counselor, so I get to talk to a lot of Soldiers. The stories they tell me – I don’t think I could function without getting those stories out in some form or another. And to keep working at getting closer to this. I would think it would be important to remember, to have something to go back to (also to lighten the weight of memory). I’m reading a collection of stories and poems by Soldiers called Warrior Writers: Remaking Sense. This, from the introduction: “there is a deep necessity to create when so much has been shattered and stolen – a profound sense of hope comes from the ability to rebuild.” 

The second reason is because the people who haven’t served, civilians, really want to know. My best friend always asks question after question after I spend time away for Army – she’s curious, and fascinated. Other people I know just make assumptions about what it is a Soldier does, and they’re often terribly wrong. Making connections between veterans, between veterans and civilians, is important, they’re less apt to feel isolated (that’s the hope).

SP: It’s a loaded question if ever there was one, but: Why do you write?

JL: I don’t remember ever not writing – while I was cleaning my attic last weekend I condensed boxes of journals into a storage tub, and there are journals up there dating back to childhood. I write now because I want my next poem (or story) to be better than the last.

I’m reading Mary Ruefle’s Madness, Rack, and Honey and, I think, this here where she quotes Barbara Herrnstein Smith helps explain: “varying degrees or states of tension seem to be involved in all our experiences, and that the most gratifying ones are those in which whatever tensions are created are also released.” When I am able to squeeze the juice out of a moment, an experience, a time in my life and make from it a poem (or story), there does seem something more gratifying about the moment/experience.

SP: I’m always curious what books artists are reading. What books have you read recently and what did you find remarkable about them?

JL: Last night I finished The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls, which is now one of my favorite books (my husband says I say this at the end of most books). I’m amazed by Walls’s persistence, her determination to succeed when she had everything stacked against her. Her book made me want to be better (this is a big idea, of course, but something I’m constantly working on) and before that book I read Grit by Angela Duckworth and Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn – there’s clearly a theme here.

Jan LaPerle lives in East Tennessee with her husband, Clay Matthews, and daughter, Winnie. She has published a book of poetry, It Would Be Quiet (Prime Mincer Press, 2013), an e-chap of flash fiction, Hush (Sundress Publications, 2012), a story in verse, A Pretty Place To Mourn (BlazeVOX, 2014), and several other stories and poems, and in 2014 she won an individual artist grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission. LaPerle was on Active Duty at Fort Campbell for three years and has spent 12 years as an Army Reservist, most recently as a Career Counselor.

Sean Purio is an active duty officer working toward his PhD in Creative Writing. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: “Break the Habit” by Tara Betts

Betts_womaninred

Disclosure

You wanted the secrets splayed on the floor,
dissected, so you could tell the whisperers
and prodders you were there. You could use
someone’s pain as a platform, be an authority
on speculation, not an authority, but an inflation,
hot air barely suspended. What you don’t realize
is secrets can be killed or released into the wild
never to be witnessed again. Once I set them free,
you are a thin-skinned balloon, and I, am hatpin.


This selection comes from the collection Break the Habit, available from Trio House Press. Order your copy here. Our curator for September is Donna Vorreyer.

Tara Betts is the author of Break the Habit (Trio House Press, 2016) and Arc & Hue (Willow Books, 2009).  Tara is also one of the co-editors of The Beiging of America: Personal Narratives About Being Mixed Race in the 21st Century (2Leaf Press, 2017). Her work has appeared in POETRYAmerican Poetry ReviewEssenceNYLON, and numerous anthologies. She teaches at University of Illinois-Chicago.

Donna Vorreyer is the author of Every Love Story is an Apocalypse Story (Sundress Publications, 2016) and A House of Many Windows (Sundress Publications, 2013) as well as seven chapbooks, most recently Encantado, a collaboration with artist Matt Kish from Redbird Chapbooks. She is the reviews editor for Stirring: A Literary Collection, and she works as a middle school teacher in the Chicago suburbs.

An Interview with Jeb A. Herrin


The Sundress Academy for the Arts’ first writing retreat for veterans and current service members will take place October 7-8 at Firefly Farms. A weekend pass includes one-on-one and group instruction, writing supplies, food, drinks, and all on-site amenities for $75. Tents, sleeping bags, and other camping equipment are available to rent. The event will be open to people of all backgrounds and experience levels. Space at the workshop is limited to 15 people, so reserve your spot today!

On behalf of Sundress, Sean Purio interviewed Jeb A. Herrin, a poet and U.S. Army veteran, who will lead the retreat along with fiction writer and current military service member Jan LaPerle.

Sean Purio: What advice would you give to people making the transition back into the civilian world? If you were to suggest to them a particular book, poetry collection, author, film, what would it be? 

Jeb Herrin: As far as advice, I always make sure I tell my buddies to never go it alone. Even if the transition isn’t a hard one to make, we’ve spent so many years working as part of a team that it doesn’t make sense to try and move back into our old lives on our own. Whether it’s just staying in touch with the friends you served with, reaching back out to the friends you had before you joined, or just making new friends, it’s still good to have someone watching your back.

In regards to recommendations, Yusef Komunyakaa. I love his collection, Dien Cai Dau, but I don’t think there’s a bad Komunyakaa piece.

SP: Is there a particular book, poetry collection, author, or film you would suggest people encounter before going into the armed forces? Why? 

JH: Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried. It sets a realistic precedent of what to expect from military service; not just the job itself, but the diversity of people you meet, and the expectations placed on you by your peers and the civilians who don’t know what it’s like to do the job.

SP: What do you think is the role of cultivating an artistic sensibility—a way of perceiving the world—for those who serve (or have served) in the armed forces?

JH: I think we spend so much of our time in the military looking at things head-on, looking for the best way to overcome obstacles or to accomplish tasks. Looking at these experiences with more of an artistic eye gives us different perspectives by which to judge them, which is really important for our own mental health. Rather than looking back on our time and dwelling on whether we made the “right” choice or the “wrong” choice, we get the opportunity to see more of how our choices affected us on a more personal level. The downside of that is sometimes we get stuck in the bad, and it’s good to have that backup I talked about before to keep us in the good.

SP: It’s a loaded question if ever there was one, but: Why do you write? 

JH: Because it’s fun. It gives me the opportunity to explore ideas, daydreams, storylines that get stuck in my head; not unlike listening to a song because it’s been stuck in your head for the past week. It also gives me the opportunity to read a story that I wish someone else would write.

SP: I’m always curious what books artists are reading. What books have you read recently and what did you find remarkable about them? 

JH: I finally started getting into Brian Turner’s Here, Bullet. I haven’t gotten too far into it yet, mostly because his poems are really visceral and I want to give each of them time to process. I don’t know if this works in with your question, but I’ve also been reading Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series to my son. He’s not quite old enough to get into them on the same level I do, but he keeps bringing the books to me to read for him, so I like to oblige; encourage that spirit of adventure and education that comes with reading. What I really like about Pratchett is his ability to delve into all sorts of different personalities and stories for his characters, and build a real world that mimics our own, while still embracing the wonder and discovery that you get with really good fantasy.

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Jeb A. Herrin was a medic with the 3rd Infantry Division during Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. He earned his BA in English and MFA in Poetry from the University of Tennessee, where he was the 2016 winner of the John C. Hodges Award for Creative Writing for Poetry. His work can be found in Political Punch and O-Dark-Thirty. Jeb has future plans of blending the world of composition with creative writing as well as finding ways to make the voice of the veteran heard. He lives in Knoxville with his wife, son, and two dogs.

Sean Purio is an active-duty officer working toward his PhD in Creative Writing. He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee.

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The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: “Break the Habit” by Tara Betts

Betts_womaninred

When I Loved You

A time marked me not knowing better
as if you spelled out some language
of my ancestors in stones, and somehow
I began remembering those words, spelling
and signing, then dancing and singing.

One night, you stopped in a parking lot
where we munched on fries from cardboard
boxes and Hector Lavoe sung Aguanile—
a phrase he wheedled gracefully from Spanish
and Yoruba until I did not care about being
parked in an empty parking lot.

I flung my door open and you turned
the volume up until the blacktop echoed.
My white skirt spun in circles around
your car, and I laughed like gold bells.

When the song ended, the hollow of each
bell crushed a clapper inside, into balls
crinkled as used aluminum foil.


This selection comes from the collection Break the Habit, available from Trio House Press. Order your copy here. Our curator for September is Donna Vorreyer.

Tara Betts is the author of Break the Habit (Trio House Press, 2016) and Arc & Hue (Willow Books, 2009).  Tara is also one of the co-editors of The Beiging of America: Personal Narratives About Being Mixed Race in the 21st Century (2Leaf Press, 2017). Her work has appeared in POETRYAmerican Poetry ReviewEssenceNYLON, and numerous anthologies. She teaches at University of Illinois-Chicago.

Donna Vorreyer is the author of Every Love Story is an Apocalypse Story (Sundress Publications, 2016) and A House of Many Windows (Sundress Publications, 2013) as well as seven chapbooks, most recently Encantado, a collaboration with artist Matt Kish from Redbird Chapbooks. She is the reviews editor for Stirring: A Literary Collection, and she works as a middle school teacher in the Chicago suburbs.

An Interview with Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick, Author of Before Isadore

original

Before Isadore, Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick’s debut full-length book, can be purchased here.

Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick knows how to pack a punch. Her new full-length book, Before Isadore, is stacked with bravado, vulnerability, and heart-wrenching detail. In the collection, which includes 51 poems, Hardwick takes on tough topics, including abortion, divorce, grief, and loss. Her strategy seems to be to pick at them over and over again, always coming from a new angle, in order to tell a full story that is totally truth, and totally breathtaking.

I sat down with Hardwick to talk about the collection, writing about grief, her advice for poets aspiring to publish a full-length book, and what’s next for her.


Danielle Alexander: What’s your writing process like and when did you know you had a collection that could be a book?

Shannon Elizabeth Harwick: This book actually came out in a manic phase of two to three sittings. The poems were being processed for a while. I actually went through about a year of complete silence and germination. I guess you could call it severe writer’s block. I think it was due to the emotional complexities of grief and processing said grief. But I always hold onto the words of Carl Jung that even when we aren’t outwardly creating, our subconscious is doing the work underneath. The middle section, about how things are made, came later. And it took another year and a half or so to be ready and able to edit the personal pieces. The initial spurt of writing came after a dream where I saw a book called “Before Isadore” and I saw my name as the author. I woke up and said “well, guess I’ll see where this goes, then!” I was pretty lucky overall. I also used an editor, Sandy Marchetti, to work with me on the book as I needed a disinterested party to help me organize and “drown the puppies” that were not working.

DA: Talk to me about the titles in the second part of the book (How a …. Is Made). Did these poems spiral from one another? If so, which one came first? Were they written around the same time?

SEH: Yes, these poems worked as a series. I started writing How Things Were Made as part of an April Poetry Month series inspired by how a person / body / is formed. I wanted to create my own myth, I guess, as a way of taking back some power into what I felt at the time I had destroyed.

DA: I love the idea of creating your own myth. I can’t wait to play around with that. Another thing I noticed about your work is that you experiment with form, capitalization, and punctuation throughout the collection. What intentionality goes into your form choices? Is there a style or form you like most when you write poetry?

SEH:  I like to form each poem around the specific piece’s personality, if that makes sense. What works for the tone and voice and subject, etc. Something more mystical may require more “air”, more “space”, etc.

DA: That’s so interesting. I love the idea of each poem having its own personality; that’s such a neat way to think about form. It makes sense why your “How a…Is Made” pieces all have more formal structure, punctuation, and capitalization. Speaking of those pieces, what’s the most difficult thing about writing about tough topics like grief and loss? What tips do you have for it?

SEH: I guess the biggest piece of advice is don’t force it. It may take years to write about something painful. It may not. And if it comes before you’re expecting it it, be prepared to set it aside and come back to it later when more distance has been created. There’s really no formula for grief and one way may work for one kind of grief and not for another. Let the animal of grief come to you. Don’t force it to speak.

DA: What advice do you have for poets who want to pursue a full-length book?

SEH: Let people who have no particular investment into your work or career read for you (like a paid editor). Don’t show it to someone who’s also your friend. Find presses that publish works that speak to you. Again, take your time but on the same token, your first book will always disappoint you, no matter what. I had a teacher tell me that. And it should. Because you should keep growing as a writer. So while you should not rush putting your first full length out into the world, you also shouldn’t sit on it forever. Be flexible, too. I had another manuscript that I was determined to be my first book and you know what? This one came first, even though the other one I had been working on for years

DA: What’s next for you?

SEH: I am working on an even better book, of course. Haha!  I also want to write more book reviews, write more essay and non-fiction and secretly, I’m working on a YA novel. Shhh! Don’t tell anyone.


 

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Shannon Elizabeth Hardwick’s work has appeared in Salt Hill, Stirring, Versal, The Texas Observer, Devil’s Lake, Four Way Review, among others. She is listed as a contributor of both poetry and prose in A Shadow Map: An Anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault published by Civil Coping Mechanisms. Hardwick has chapbooks out with Thrush Press and Mouthfeel Press and serves as the poetry editor for The Boiler Journal. Before Isadore is her first full-length collection. 

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Danielle Alexander is a writer and the owner of Grey Grey Books, an online and pop up shop that sells used books, zines, and handmade journals in Michigan. Her writing has appeared in The Bandit Zine’s Love & Heartbreak Issue and The Aquinas College Sampler, where her poem Mother received an American Academy of Poet’s Honorable Mention. She has self-published two poetry chapbooks – Sunlight Get Through (2016) and Chasing Rabbits (2016); and recently self-published Ten Lists: A Workbook for Anxiety (2017). Danielle holds a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts Degree in English and Creative Writing from Aquinas College and will be pursuing an MFA in nonfiction or poetry in 2018. Her work can be found at http://www.greygreybooks.com.

 

Sundress Academy for the Arts Announces Writing Retreat for Veterans


Sundress Academy for the Arts is excited to announce its first writing retreat for veterans on October 7-8, 2017. This two-day retreat at SAFTA’s Firefly Farms is for military veterans and current service members and will be a space for creativity, writing exercises, discussions on ways to write about trauma, advice on publishing, and more. This weekend will be an opportunity to express shared experiences and learn to write your story for a non-military audience.

A weekend pass includes one-on-one and group instruction, writing supplies, food, drinks, and all on-site amenities for $75. Tents, sleeping bags, and other camping equipment are available to rent.

The event will be open to people of all backgrounds and experience levels and will provide an opportunity to work with talented, published fiction writers and poets, including Jeb A. Herrin and Jan LaPerle.

Herrin

Jeb A. Herrin was a medic with the 3rd Infantry Division during Operations Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn. He earned his BA in English and MFA in Poetry from the University of Tennessee, where he was the 2016 winner of the John C. Hodges Award for Creative Writing for Poetry. His work can be found in Political Punch and O-Dark-Thirty. Jeb has future plans of blending the world of composition with creative writing as well as finding ways to make the voice of the veteran heard. He lives in Knoxville with his wife, son, and two dogs.

 

Photo_Jan_Sundress

Jan LaPerle lives in East Tennessee with her husband, Clay Matthews, and daughter, Winnie. She has published a book of poetry, It Would Be Quiet (Prime Mincer Press, 2013), an e-chap of flash fiction, Hush (Sundress Publications, 2012), a story in verse, A Pretty Place To Mourn (BlazeVOX, 2014), and several other stories and poems, and in 2014 she won an individual artist grant from the Tennessee Arts Commission. LaPerle was on Active Duty at Fort Campbell for three years and has spent 12 years as an Army Reservist, most recently as a Career Counselor.

 

Space at this workshop is limited to 15 people, so reserve your place today.

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Project Bookshelf: Emily Corwin

IMG_20170607_152115_805 (1)

My boyfriend, Joe and I just got this bookcase from a friend who is moving to Poland. We’ve been looking for an extra bookcase for months since we both have so many books (and, let’s face it, we’re going to keep buying them). For now, I’ve been putting favorite books and recently-read books on this shelf. My goal this summer is to read through all of the poetry collections I gathered during the school year. Some recent favorites on here:Blues Triumphant by Jonterri Gadson, Forest Primeval by Vievee Francis, Wolf Lake, White Gown Blown Open by Diane Seuss, Gilt by Raena Shirali, Careful Mountainby Sara June Woods, Take This Stallion by Anaïs Duplan, Meet Me Here At Dawn by Sophie Klahr, Wasp Queen by Claudia Cortese, Bestiary by Donika Kelly,Wunderkammer by Cynthia Cruz, Landscape with Headless Mama and Protection Spell by Jennifer Givhan, and Sugarblood by Liz Bowen.

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Emily Corwin is an MFA candidate in poetry at Indiana University-Bloomington and the former Poetry Editor for Indiana Review. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Gigantic Sequins, Day One, Hobart, Tinderbox Poetry Journal, THRUSH, and elsewhere. She has two chapbooks, My Tall Handsome (Brain Mill Press) and darkling (Platypus Press) which were published in 2016. Her first full-length collection, tenderling is forthcoming in 2018 from Stalking Horse Press. You can follow her online at @exitlessblue.

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The Weekly Writing Round-Up

As school starts again and the summer is swept up into fall, there’s no mistake that Virgo season is in full swing; what better time to present a neat & tidy weekly roundup to share work from the previous week (and sometimes further back) that you may have missed? Every Friday morning I’ll be sharing poetry, prose, and other art from the week before that you do not want to miss.

Poetry&Fiction:

  • Crab Fat Magazine has a new issue out featuring writing by Linette Reeman:“i have thrown up three times that day already and/you wanted to make sure i could hear in your voice how much you didn’t care anymore/the waning sun-light drenches my pores and everyone sees me how you do.”
  • Danielle Pafunda’s poetry in the latest issue of The Tiny: “I asked to be bride-dissolved I asked to be sick and then / well, on shore I couldn’t / explain that my heart was a hospital in a hospital gown in a hospital I couldn’t explain that pain / was sex and you had both when you had me I couldn’t explain what I had done”
  • Poetry by Benjamin Garcia in The Boston Review: “In the language of flowers // I am the one who says // fuck you” 
  • Poetry by Logan February in Agbowo Journal: “i understand that someone / has to die for me to be free / i just think that someone / is too often me”
  • HOW TO AVOID A HAUNTING by Terry Abrahams on The Wanderer: “here in the dark / we don’t need to be boys / we can be better”
  • Southern Humanities Review’s Undocumented Writers feature, edited by Christopher Soto and featuring work by Claudia D. Hernandez: “We didn’t bathe / in the // river. / Instead, we floated like thin paper boats, tanned by / the sun.”

Non-Fiction:


Stephanie Kaylor is a writer from upstate New York. She holds a MA in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from the University at Albany and is currently finishing a MA in Philosophy at the European Graduate School. Stephanie is Managing Editor for Five:2:One Magazine and Reviews Editor for Glass: A Journal of Poetry. Her poetry has appeared in journals including Queen Mob’s Teahouse, BlazeVOX, The Willow Review, and Yes, Poetry.

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